viernes, 23 de marzo de 2018

3D printing of RF metamaterials using hydrogel inks

Applications are invited for a fully funded PhD studentship (4 years) within the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Additive Manufacturing in the Faculty of Engineering at the University of Nottingham.

Materials with intrinsic difference of electrical properties are highly desirable for RF metamaterials. Additively manufacture metamaterials using materials with dissimilar electrical properties will widen the spectrum of controlling the RF response of the printed structures and increase the application prospect to include various frequencies ranging from MHz to THz

The successful PhD student will work alongside a team of other PhD students and post-doctoral researchers involved in related projects. This project is supported by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) through the EPSRC Centre for Doctoral Training in Additive Manufacturing at the University of Nottingham

Additive Manufacturing to create metallic glass alloys

Researchers have now demonstrated and exposed in the paper "Additive Manufacturing of an iron-based bulk metallic glass larger than the critical casting thickness," the ability to create amorphous metal, or metallic glass, alloys using 3D Printing technology, opening the door to a variety of applications in the UAV industry, such as more efficient electric motors, better wear-resistant materials, higher strength materials, and lighter weight structures. The paper is published in the journal Applied Materials Today. The paper was co-authored by Harvey West, Timothy Horn and Christopher Rock of NC State; Lena Thorsson, Mattias Unosson and Peter Skoglund of Sindre Metals; and Evelina Vogli of Liquidmetal Coatings. The work was done with support from the National Science Foundation under grant number 1549770.

The technique works by applying a laser to a layer of metal powder, melting the powder into a solid layer that is only 20 microns thick. The "build platform" then descends 20 microns, more powder is spread onto the surface, and the process repeats itself. Because the alloy is formed a little at a time, it cools quickly - retaining its amorphous qualities. However, the end result is a solid, metallic glass object - not an object made of laminated, discrete layers of the alloy. 

lunes, 19 de marzo de 2018

Additive Manufacturing for RF Components

The Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Weapons Development and Integration (WDI) Directorate has a program known as PRIntable Materials with Embedded Electronics (PRIME2). PRIME2 will integrate RF and electronics into Additive Manufacturing processes to reduce size, weight, and overall cost of these components and subsystems.

This program will advance the state of the art in printable electronics, and deliver a materials database, process development, modeling, and simulation of 3D-printed objects with embedded conductive elements, passive prototypes, and RF prototypes. PRIME2 will create a new fabrication capability (applied to electronics and RF technology areas), weight reduction, higher reliability, and on-demand (local and immediate) spare components in the field.

Additive Manufacturing In Aerospace: Strategic Implications

Aerospace manufacturers have used Additive Fabrication Systems since ’80s. But in the past few years, rapid advancements in Additive Fabrication Technology have led applications of the technology in the aerospace industry to proliferate.

Additive Manufacturing formerly occupied a niche role in aerospace manufacturing as a technology for prototyping. As recent developments suggest, however, Additive Technology is rapidly becoming a strategic technology that will generate revenues throughout the aerospace supply chain.

Firms that are already committed to shifting the strategic dynamics of Additive Manufacturing in Space and Defense Markets include: Airbus, Boeing, Honeywell, Lockheed Martin, and Pratt & Whitney.

sábado, 17 de marzo de 2018

USAF looks for RAAMs

No details as to the type or capabilities of the proposed AAM were disclosed, neither were proposed development and fielding timelines or contract values, but the AFLCMC (Air Force Life Cycle Management Center) Medium Altitude UAS Division disclosed on 7 March that it intended to award the OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) a sole-source contract for the development of an MQ-9 RAAM (Reaper Air-to-Air Missile) Aviation Simulation (AVSIM) as the first step in the process of fielding such a capability.

The Reaper can currently carry up to 16 Lockheed Martin AGM-114P Hellfire missiles. It has also been cleared for the carriage of two GBU-12 Paveway II laser-guided bombs and the GBU-38 500 lb variant of the Joint Direct Attack Munition (JDAM), and for mixed loads of these weapons. Now, the US Air Force (USAF) is looking to equip its General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Inc (GA-ASI) MQ-9 Reaper unmanned aircraft systems (UASs) with an air-to-air missile (AAM) capability for the first time.

To date, the Reaper has been employed for intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) and strike missions only, and the inclusion of air-to-air combat in its mission set would represent a significant expansion of its capabilities. While such an enhancement would be a first for the Reaper, the USAF has fitted short-range AAMs to UAVs previously.

Afghanistan: 4 IS killed in UAV strike

In a statement, the 201st Silab Corps of the Afghan National Army (ANA) said that the US military carried out an airstrike on an IS hideout in the last 24 hours by using an UAV, Khaama Press reported.

It added that the airstrike was carried out in Lechalam area in Manogi district of Kunar province and four IS militants were confirmed dead by the ANA. One militant was also injured in the airstrike.

The ANA said that the airstrike did not affect the local residents and security personnel in the province. The latest round of airstrike comes after 15 Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) militants were killed in an airstrike in Kunar province last week.

viernes, 16 de marzo de 2018

Additive Fabrication of UAS: Commercial Outlook for a New Industry

Major parts of UAVs have traditionally been assembled from components made of molded plastic, but the development of Additive Fabrication presents the option of printing UAV parts instead: The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is using Additive Fabrication Technology to develop UAV prototypes that may someday be used to explore the surface of Mars, and The Pentagon has developed an Additive Manufacturing Strategic Roadmap to get customized UAVsNow, some new technologies and pending federal regulations are enabling the manufacture and use of UAVs in domestic commerce, giving rise to a growing commercial UAV industry.